About your Search

20111001
20111031
STATION
WMPT (PBS) 109
LANGUAGE
English 109
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)
to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the clandestine operation and the administration's push to punish iran with new sanctions. >> brown: then, we examine the economic and social fall-out from alabama's tough new immigration law. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports on the visit of south korea's president lee as he and president obama celebrate a new trade deal and consider how to rein in north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> with north korea you never have a good option. the worse options is to leave them alone and to let their nuclear missile program go completely unabated for four years of obama. >> brown: ray suarez explores fascinating new research on the genetic makeup of the bubonic plague that killed millions of europeans in the middle ages. >> woodruff: and tom clarke of i.t.n. reports from the remote highlands of colombia, where half the population will inherit early onset alzheimers disease. >> these families' plight has come to attention of the ou
evening and thanks for joining us. google shares take flight after hours, jumping over $30 a share, susie, after the web giant crushed analyst estimates with its latest earnings. >> susie: tom, profits surged 26% and revenues posted an even bigger gain. here's how the numbers stacked up. google earned $2.7 billion, or $9.72 a share, almost a dollar ahead of analyst's estimates. revenues were also better than expected, up 33% to $7.5 billion. >> tom: joining us with more-- scott kessler. he follows google as senior director of technology research at s&p capital iq. with us tonight in new york. scott, how do you describe these quarterly results from google, blew estimates out of the water. >> yeah, tom, i would say having covered the stock for more than seven years, probably between good and great. google over the years has really delivered time and time again. this quarter was no exception. what was surprising to us was the combination of accelerating revenue growth for the fourth straight quarter as well as continuing improvement in margins reflecting well controlled costs and expenses. t
to the global economy. if not, they might sink into a global recession. >> we have heard the u.s. say that europe must get its act together and putting extreme pressure on them reaching a solution. is there anything the u.s. can do in practical terms at this point? >> know. from the point of european leaders, it is pretty rich to hear tim geithner telling them what to do. i think what is different in europe is that the banking sector is much bigger. this is four times the size of the u.s. banking sector. the sovran crisis is much bigger. the stakes are higher and many governments have to come together. -- the sovereign crisis is much higher. >> thank you for joining us. rescue workers in turkey are continuing to search for survivors from the earthquake. two people have been pulled out from the rubble. one of them is a university student and was found alive 60 hours after the earthquake. rescue workers broke into the floor as he emerged from the debris. our correspondent sent this report. >> slowly they are digging down into the heart of the masses of concrete that were once people's h
us this footage showing clashes between troops and protesters. they say this has been going on for months. this is why we asked the government for permission to visit duma. this was the first place in damascus to see protests. as we enter duma the, the mood changes. we start to see soldiers. look closely. they are concealed in this all of growth. -- in this olive grove. we asked these men to go to places where people gathered. they take us to a filling station. we have been trying to negotiate with our escort. what we can see in the suburbs of duma, this is not very much. this is the time of day when not a lot of people are on the streets. people don't really want to film here. it feels like a ghost town. we have to meet people who live here. they insist, we need to move on. our next stop, a round about. pretty but deserted. we were hoping to meet some of the people of duma but it is pretty quiet here. we hear the call to prayer. can we go to the main mosque? they say, there isn't one. >> we haven't even talked to one person. you want us to go? ok, we're going. ok. they tell
for his safety. there have been acts of kindness. >> thank you so much for joining us. the u.s. secretary of state calls it a dangerous escalation, a senior u.s. centers said it may be an act of war. the alleged iranian plot to kill the saudi ambassador to washington had american officials fuming today. hillary clinton also warned the government will be held accountable. the u.s. has charged two iranians. >> this is the organization at the heart of the u.s. allegations. iran's revolutionary guards corps. it is the most powerful institution in iran. inside the guard corp. is a smaller group, special operations. americus says that this man, manssor arbabsiar, has admitted being hired by the force to carry out a first ever attack inside the united states. >> it is an outrageous act and the iranians will have to be held accountable. when you see the case presented, you will find there is compelling evidence for the assertion been made from local sources. >> his -- here is the target of the plot. saudi arabia's ambassador to the united states, adel al-jubeir. and theburden of proof hama amount
but over, and pledged to pull out u.s. forces by the end of this year. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> woodruff: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we excerpt the president's remarks; and margaret warner talks with white house deputy national security advisor denis mcdonough about the coming draw-down . >> woodruff: then, we ask libya's ambassador to the u.s., ali suleiman aujali, about the questions surrounding moammar qaddafi's death and what's next for his country. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and paul solman talks to author michael lewis about his new book, a travelogue of sorts about nations hit hard by the financial crisis. >> all these different societies were faced with exactly the same temptation-- free money. they behaved radically differently from one another. why? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it'
the stock. >> tom: then, talking tough on trade to boost the u.s. economy. >> i want to see fair trade policies, and if they're not going to be fair, you cut it off or you tax the hell out of them. >> tom: coming up, our interview with real estate mogul donald trump. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 20. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt in new york. it's solid sales for microsoft in the company's most recent quarter. >> suzanne: tom, firms are buying microsoft's office and server software, and that business offset weak consumer demand for p.c.s. microsoft earned 68 cents a share in its fiscal first quarter, in line with wall street forecasts. revenues, however, were a bit better than expected, coming in at $17.3 billion. >> tom: microsoft shares traded slightly lower aft
, in fact, a u.s. informant. >> so, an iranian plot to kill a saudi ambassador using mexican drug traffickers bringing terror to washington. authorities here admit it sounds like a hollywood script, but the final act is still unfolding. in response, the u.s. treasury has imposed sanctions on four senior members of the revolutionary guard. washington will use this case to further isolate tehran diplomatically. >> we will be consulting with our friends and partners around the world about how we can send a very strong message that this kind of action, which violates international norms, must be ended. >> the iranian authorities have dismissed the allegations as a fabrication, war mongering propaganda by america. a broken relationship is suddenly even more challenged. steve kingston, bbc news, washington. >> now to a name which reverberates through israel. gilad shalit, the young soldier kidnapped by hamas five years ago and whose release has been a battle of political wills ever since. well, now, the israeli prime minister, netanyahu, says his freedom has been secured. he'll be back
america" reporting from washington. a 11 years in prison. the longest sentence in u.s. history for insider trading. kidnapped at gunpoint. aids workers are snatched from the world's largest refugee camp. and chilean miners celebrate one year after their rescue. their fate has not always been so merry. welcome to our viewers around the globe. once a high-flying financier, today he was sentenced to 11 years in prison for his role in one of the biggest insider- trading cases in american history. prosecutors wished for 25 years. the judge issued a clear warning for anyone tempted to follow the same path. our reporter was inside the courtroom in new york and send this report. >> he was once little known outside the world of wall street hedge funds. that was before he committed a crime the judge described as a virus in the business culture that needs to be eradicated. the drama that played out in front of this manhattan courthouse had him saying little as he waited to learn his fate. he has only a few weeks before he must report to prison on november 28. down the road on wall street, they have b
deals, and they're all about boosting u.s. jobs. >> and this jobs bill, mr. speaker, does not require a tax increase. this jobs bill does not require us to go into debt. and this jobs bill has bipartisian support. >> tom: from boosting jobs through trade to losing jobs on wall street, we look at what job cuts in the world of finance could mean for the u.s. economy. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, october 12. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. high hopes on wall street today. u.s. investors bought up stocks after european officials rolled out what's seen as the most credible plan so far to prop up european banks. tom? >> tom: susie, the plan was rolled out today by the president of the european commission, jose manuel barrosa. he called on european leaders to act quickly and agree at a meeting in two weeks. here's what he's calling for. europea
money or your life," you choose to hand your money over. >> tom: and back in the u.s., the economy does more than limp along, taking the threat of recession off the table for now. >> the message is that the economy is still recovering. it's a slow growth recovery, it's a bumpy one, but the recovery is ongoing. >> tom: it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 27. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment. we have good news from both sides of the atlantic ocean today, pushing major stock indices into positive territory for the year. it was a big day of buying for shareholders. the dow rocketed up 339 points to close above 12,000 for the first time since early august. the nasdaq shot up almost 88 points. the s&p 500 rallied more than 42 points. big board volume spiked to just under 1.5 billion sha
back. terror was used as a political weapon. today, we can definitively say the good of the regime has come to an end. the last major strongholds have fallen. the new government is consolidating control over the country in one -- and one of the world's longest-serving dictators is no more. >> one of the american politicians who pushed hardest for the u.s. to get involved in the nato mission is senator marco rubio of florida. he joins me from capitol hill. thank you for joining me. you have been a firm advocate of the nato mission. i imagine you feel this justifies your position. >> this is an opportunity for the libyan people to turn the page. i think all the credit belongs to them for taking up this cause. obviously, i know they are grateful for the help from nato, but this is a day i am happy for the libyan people. they have an opportunity to build a free and prosperous libya. >> the canadians have already said they think they will and their military involvement in the next couple of weeks. nato is meeting tomorrow in brussels. do you think it is time for the international community
>> susie: stocks flirt with new lows for the year on growing concerns about the u.s. and global economies. >> our markets are so fragile, the littlest thing really moves our markets in a negative way. >> tom: from bankruptcy rumors swirling around american airlines to fresh lows for bank of america investors. it's "nightly business report" for monday, october 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. a grisly start to the fourth quarter on wall street. the major averages tumbled today as much as 3%, moving stocks closer to bear market territory, tom. >> tom: susie, investors were startled by news that greece will miss deficit reduction targets it agreed to as part of its bailout deal. concerns about europe continue to impact trading here in the u.s. at the bell, the dow plunged 258 points. the nasdaq lost almost 80 and the s&p fell 32. trading volume star
. the former pakistani president gives us his friend assessment of where things stand with the u.s.. >> there is a breakdown in confidence between pakistan and the u.s.. >> get ready broadway, there is a new twist on the language barrier leaving audiences laughing. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after a marathon session which stretched into the morning, the leaders of the eurozone said they struck a deal which will help solve the debt crisis. banks are being asked to write off half of what they were owed. global markets cheered what they heard, was this enough to save the euro? clucks europe woke to the news that against expectations, the leaders had agreed on a plan to fix the eurozone crisis. it might not where did the big bazooka some are calling for but politicians claimed that during the night the euro had been saved. >> i think it is much better than before. >> you will have to wait a couple of days to be sure. >> stock markets enjoyed a bounce. the euro crisis had been seen as increasing the risk of global recession. leaders had been unde
to overcome the criticism that he belongs to a cult. a texas pastor will tell us why a mormon is not necessarily fit for the white house. in egypt, the military is accused of organizing violence that leaves 25 people dead. as christians in cairo react, what does this say about life after the revolution. designed in scotland but made in mongolia by north koreans. you might be surprised where your winter belize come from -- winter woolies come from. republican presidential hopefuls gathered again this week for a presidential debate and new hampshire. among the hopefuls is the former governor of massachusetts, mitt romney. he needs the support of bible belt america to successfully tracked the path to the white house. he is a mormon. some believe that it is a cult. >> out of the mountains they came searching for resign. in the shadow of the mountains in utah, the mormons founded their promised land. under the vast blue skies of the west, the church of jesus christ of latter-day saints built a city near the great salt lake. [singing] here in salt lake city, the church grew rich. it
gaddafi. now our guides were keen to show us that he was gone. the spectacle was over and the lines had been drawn. the country was ready to move on. g chips in the new libya. this giant fist once stood in colonel gaddafi's libyan compound. now it has been brought back here to misrata as a sign of their achievement. colonel gaddafi's body is the ultimate war trophy of all, and the five days of wrangling over its burial was a sign of the intensive political positioning that is now going on behind the scenes. >> the defeated loyalists are getting used to a new reality. this man is now a prisoner. he was one of those who prepared muammar gaddafi body for burial. he said the colonel's followers have only one option now. >> everything was clear. now the end of gaddafi means a new life. >> but it is not going to be easy. in misrata, very slowly, life is beginning to get back to normal, as people change from their military fatigues back to civilian clothes. the real revolution starts here, this man told me, after the death of gaddafi. this was a peaceful revolution we started back in february.
are arrested in the u.s. after trying to assassinate the saudi ambassador. it is a plot for a movie, says the fbi. child sacrifice, new victims, and one was very lucky to survive. we have a special report. >> the many claims kidnapped him for sacrifice live in this village and were arrested and released without charge, but members of this community say they continue to take children for sacrifice. >> and hidden below the ice of antarctica, a group of scientists are digging deep to find a source of life that has never been seen before. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and elsewhere around the world. a plot to assassinate the saudi ambassador to washington was conceived and directed from iran, according to u.s. officials, who today announced they have broken up the scheme and arrested two men with links to the saudi government. they announced the two charged apparently met members of the mexico drug cartel to carry up the order. and for more on the latest developments, i enjoyed by the bbc's adam brooke. >> they say this was a plot like in a movie. a man according to the charge shee
river. olie is movinglie i center stage. hello. thanks for being with us on "bbc world news." too many strikes. that is a snapshot of greece today. today, another general strike by public sector workers is making the task of balancing the books that much harder. it is taking athens ever closer to the default which euro-zone countries they cannot happen. we will get more on the situation across the euro-zone in a moment. first, let's go to athens. our reporter is there on what is another wretched day. >> a significant disruption. the biggest show of strength from the public sector union in several weeks. 24 hour strike currently underway by civil servants, doctors, teachers, and by air traffic controllers at athens airport. so severe disruption at athens international airport. there will be a demonstration on the square and a couple of hours' time. all of this showing anger and hostility by the majority of the population, towards the austerity drive the government is putting through. the government says it must stick to those austerity measures, public-sector job cuts and tax hikes, to
afghanistan. there is the means of whoever would like to use those against both countries. the taliban would like to move a finger without pakistan's support. the fact is that the taliban were and are stationed in pakistan. we all know that. the pakistani government knows that, we know that. this is not in a manner of accusation and reprimand -- reprimand. >> if you say that you will not talk to the very people -- >> we did not say that we will not talk to them, we don't know who to talk to. we don't have an address. the moment we have been addressed, we will talk to them. >> the policy until just the other day was to talk this to them. >> we were demanding, we are asking for negotiations. we wanted to talk to them. with the assassination of the president by someone who came in the name of a messenger from the have an we don't address of someone to talk to. you don't talk to suicide bombers to come in the messages of peace. the fact that we are not dealing with an identifiable individual as representing the taliban or a place that we can knock on and say, we want to talk to. until that place
drones are used to target terrorists. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks to anita hill about her new book on race and gender, 20 years after she accused then-supreme court nominee clarence thomas of sexual harassment. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on >> if i can symbolize the ability to pursue gender equality, racial equality and to be truthful about our experiences, then absolutely that's what i want to be. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in tru
posted impressive gains in october, but november could also be a key month for the markets. the u.s. economy and the european financial situation will continue to be watched closely. and don't forget, a third of the firms in the s&p 500 still have to report third-quarter results. so far this earnings season, the message from corporate america has been pretty encouraging. >> as we've gotten through this earnings season-- the third quarter reporting season-- we are still seeing 70% of companies beating expectations-- about 16% year-over-year-growth. in terms of profits, it's still very, very strong. >> reporter: many strategists predict stocks could gain 5% to 10% by the end of the year. the big caveat is what happens in europe. >> it's kind of like groundhog day, where we wake up to the same movie over and over again-- the same situation. i think this europe situation is going to come back. i think it is going to plague us again. >> reporter: so although there could be more goodies in store for stocks the next few months, it's clear the market's goblins haven't entirely disappeared.
the mark. alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld joins us with an update. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a bad start to earnings season-- late today, alcoa posted a skimpy profit that was much lower than expected. the aluminum giant is the first dow component to report and, susie, investors are worried that this a is bad omen for upcoming quarterly results. >> susie: tom, investors were disappointed-- alcoa reported right after the closing bell, and the stock fell more than 3.5% following the earnings release. here's why-- the company earned 15 cents a share in the third quarter, up from a year ago, but seven cents below analysts' estimates. alcoa blamed it on a big drop in aluminum prices and slow economic growth. revenues came in slightly ahead of estimates, up 21% to $6.4 billion. joi
a plot to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s., a scheme that they said was conceived of and sponsored by the iranian government. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the charges and the alleged conspiracy. >> ifill: then we look at opening day in the trial of the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to bring down a u.s. airliner on christmas day 2009. >> brown: we debate the merits of president obama's jobs bill with two senators: michigan democrat carl levin and georgia republican johnny isakson. >> ifill: john merrow examines the dilemma faced by a pennsylvania school system that spent big on a state-of-the-art facility. >> reporter: the economic crisis hit. like rural school districts all across the country, this school had to put its ambitious dreams on hold almost overnight. the challenge became to make ends meet. >> brown: and ray suarez talks to a 94-year-old former french resistance fighter who urges young people to take to the streets and show their outrage. >> ifill: that's all ahead on
: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is on assignment tonight. europe and the u.s. economy-- those troublesome issues pressured stocks today. there were conflicting signals today on how close european leaders are on a deal to solve the debt crisis ahead of a crucial summit this weekend. investors are concerned that talks between france and germany have stalled. and in greece, one of the largest demonstrations as people protested a new batch of austerity measures. the greek parliament takes a final vote on the plan tomorrow. also worrying investors? a pessimistic report on the u.s. economy from the federal reserve. its beige book survey of regional economies showed weaker conditions for growth. all that led to a negative close on wall street. the dow lost 72 points, the nasdaq dropped 53 and the s&p slipped 15. earlier in the day, averages were solidly in positive territory. as suzanne pratt reports, today's volatility is a pattern of trading that will be with us for a while. >> reporter: one day we're up. one day we're down. with the u.s. stock market experiencing such wild
's experiment in religious education: the nation's first multi-faith school of theology. >> sock of us are looking in a jewish direction. some of us are looking in a muslim direction. some are looking into n a christian direction and yet we're all looking in a god direction. >> woodruff: plus, different screens for different kids. we look at the "app gap" among the nation's children. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and
," especially when some of the defense lawyers came out to speak to us here. that may be because there's a lack of reporting restrictions here, so for the italian press there's been a real free for all since day one that they have been able to write and say anything they wanted about amanda knox, so she was really character assassinated and at one point her father said he thought that really harmed her, especially during that first murder trial. so that was the reaction from the crowd here last night. but of course the judges and the jury would have had to put aside any of this sensational publicity that has surrounded this trial right from the beginning as they did make those decisions and acquitted amanda knox and raffaele sollecito of the murder of meredith kercher. but as we have been hearing from the kerchers this morning, it now raises questions that were there other people involved? not just rudy, who is now the only person still in prison, serving a sentence for meredith's murder. >> luisa baldini, thank you very much indeed. well, those questions are going to hang in the air for a whil
to technology and the know how to use it, the more they can participate in the country's booming economy which would get a $1 billion stimulus for the world cup and olympics. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown assesses the state of the banking industry, as some of the largest financial institutions report growing losses. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences, tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was mad
job prospects and heavy debt loads. u.s. student loan debt could top $1 trillion this year, over taking credit card debt. with so much money at stake, the occupy wall street movement is pushing the idea of debt forgiveness for students. darren gersh looks at whether that idea could really boost the economy. >> reporter: kelly mears says his high school counselors and everyone else in the student loan system told him not to worry about the debt he was taking on. >> they told me to dig my grave, essentially, and you know, really. >> reporter: like many of the students in the occupy wall street movement, mears hasn't been able to find a job, and now he and many other protesters are pressing for relief onheir student loans. >> i think interest should be forgiven, at the very least. i would like to see student loan debt forgiven, i think it would actually be a huge economic boost. and for our generation-- a whole generation of people it would re-empower them. >> reporter: but analysts say that empowerment would be expensive. >> i'm sure we all feel that we deserve forgiveness. >> rep
in syria force the u.s. to withdraw its ambassador. >> woodruff: margaret warner examines new tensions in the u.s. pakistan relationship. >> i think the obama administration understands that the relationship with pakistan spiraling out of control will jeopardize their ability to leave afghanistan. >> ifill: we look at the administration's plan to jumpstart the ailing housing industry, as president obama visits nevada, the state hit hardest by foreclosures. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks with the irish nobel laureate known as "famous seamus" about his newest collection of poems and his life's work. >> i began to write poems about my parents, kind of elegaic poems connecting up with previous generations, so that was partly human chain. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experienc
been used when the police have the genetic profile of the defendant, and therefore, they find a track and then they ask this d.n.a. was the scene of the crime and the track of the defendant can be compared with the track that they have found of the scene of the crime. because there's the scene of the crime and a lot of people couldn't be identified. they clearly have the genetic profile raffaele, and i asked myself if it was consistent with the track, and the answer is probably yes. but if the same had been done without the people, the answer would have been the same. this is the odd thing. it was a mixed track, and the number of unidentified people could have been identified with that track, that track, because it is a very confused track. there are a number of profiles in that track. now, if i ask myself then i'm going to answer yes, but even the expert can be seen in that track. >> that was the lawyer for raffaele sollecito, making a statement, as you can see, outside the courtroom. he and amanda knox have made very emotional statements proclaiming their innocence. in the murder ch
we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> in the past couple of decades, internet use has spread across the planet, invading every aspect of life. in countries like south korea, going online seems to have become a necessity. >> [speaking korean] >> usually, i go online as soon as i wake up. on average, i use the internet for about 6 hours a day. >> in a unique experiment, the bbc has removed internet access from 2 families for a week, in this the most wired nation on earth. >> in other parts of the world, the digital superhighway still hasn't reached its destination. how many people here actually know what the internet is? [indistinct chattering] >> internet? anybody? now, though, we're going to be providing internet access to this village in northern nigeria. so, what happens when we turn the internet on here? >> and off here? [indistinct chattering] >> it's not exactly the information superhighway. [bleating] welcome to the village of gitata, 2 1/2 hours north of the nigerian capital abuja. what strikes you as you arrive in gitata is the fact that it seems so disconnected from
, even at the -- as protests continue. numbers on job abuse in the u.s. >> clearly, it is a major epidemic that we need to get a grip on, so it does not continue to spiral out of control. >> a new theory -- some van gogh did not kill himself, but was shot accidentally -- vincent van gogh did not kill himself, but was shot accidentally by two teenaged boys playing with the gun. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. there are reports of bloodshed in the city of homs in central syria. the relentless protests are remarkable. the bbc investigation has found evidence of injured protesters being shot dead while lying in their hospital beds. this is one of the first journalists to get in to homs. she went in undercover. this is her exclusive report. >> despite the daily death toll, the protests in syria continue, but the tactics have changed. they're held at night to minimize casualties. the protesters called for reform today, as the name of each atrocity and massacre carried out by the assad regime is called out, the crowd called for the death of the president by
viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment tonight. some mixed news on the economy today. let's start with the good news. consumers spent more money last month, putting off fears of a recession. spending increased six tenths of a percent, that's three times what was spent in august. americans bought big ticket items like cars and computers. but, there is a flip side. and as darren gersh reports, consumers are spending faster than they save and faster than they earn. >> reporter: if americans have learned anything in the last few years, saving less and spending more is not a recipe for long run economic health, but that's what consumers were doing last month. >> wages are stagnant. people are not getting raises, people are not getting bonuses. so what's happening is that the average consumer is having to dip into her or his savings in order to keep food on the table, in order to pay mortgages, in order to pay their bills, in order to buy gasoline et cetera, and that is not sustainable. >> rep
not only take europe down, but could actually start to affect the u.s. as well. so the stakes are very high here. >> suzanne: from europe to earnings, it's a golden quarter for the golden arches and a few other big firms. what the results may suggest about the economy.. it's "nightly business report" for friday, october 21. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is on assignment tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt. suzanne, earnings and europe battled for investors attention today. stocks rallied as optimism grew ahead of this weekend's summit of european leaders. tom, several big blue chip firms reported solid results. we'll get to those numbers in a moment. but first, the market: the dow rose 267 points, the nasdaq added almost 39 and the s&p tacked on 23. trading volume, the heaviest this week. 1.1 billion shares on the big board. 2.1 bill
of the thousands of prisoners in exchange for the captured israeli soldier. bbc.com/news. to libya, and the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has held talks with the libyan internal authority in tripoli. mrs. clinton said that she was proud to be standing on the soil of a free libya and it was a privilege to see its new future being born. she is the highest lovell american official to visit libya since the uprising against colonel gaddafi. >> hillary clinton flew in on a military transporter, not her usual american government boeing. it is not equipped to deal with the surface to air missiles scattered at around libya. no government ministers, but grateful fighters chanting "god is great." the official welcome was warm and grateful, too. it is not every day the u.s. years words of thanks in the arab world. >> they give as military support, moral support, political support. we think and respect what the americans have given us. >> libya is rich with its own billions of dollars, so she did not pledge any money, but offered american expertise and assistance to rebuild the country. she called
. thank you for joining us. in thailand thousands are fleeing the capital due to flooding fears. so far more than 360 people have died in thyland's worst flooding in decades. a satellite picture shows you how this is almost completely surrounded by water. in bank cock, we have the latest. >> we have a huge volume of accumulated water built up to the north of the capital and it's now making steady progress towards the center of the city. but it is still 15-20 kilometers away from the central business district where i am talking to you now. this weekend the authorities say could be decisive in how effective their management of the control of the water has been and how much of bangkok could fall under some part of the water. there could be some areas that could escape the water altogether. but probably over the next few days most of bangkok will suffer some flooding. >> what's been the reaction in bangkok and around thyland for the way government hazardsed these -- government hazardsed this flooding? >> well, there has been some positive feedback as the government's decision to call in the
these natural resources. they just haven't been used well for the development of the people. >> woodruff: we update the story of convicted financier bernard madoff, as his wife and son speak out in new interviews. >> ifill: and betty ann bowser examines president obama's push to get lifesaving drugs to patients who need them. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising on where you find it. soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences. igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out, sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> chevron. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundation
are worried because we will lose all of the land. that will leave us with nothing. >> in an age of food and security, as prices rise across the globe, there is pressure to dramatically change the way that the land of africa is cultivated. 50 years after the end of the colonial order, zambia is opening its doors to foreigners once more. >> there are excellent conditions for agriculture, the climate, the amount of water, the quality of the soil. >> this is the zambian bush. hear, the british firm has leased an existing commercial farm of 25,000 acres. their aim is to maximize profit by maximizing yields. >> the best yield is about 14.2 pounds. >> this man runs the operation. he used to farm in zimbabwe before it being driven off the land. he says it is possible to get 30 times the yield obtained through farming. the achieve this through economies of scale, better irrigations, and a new approach to soil. >> you can extract nutrients from the soil. >> this is vulnerable to more efficient farming. the farm labor depends for accommodation, medical care, education for the children. this projec
with the question. is there room and resources for all of us? the united nations cultural organization, unesco, approved palestine as a member, prompting israel and the u.s. to freeze funding. one of the world's finest -- finest collections of islamic art goes on display in york. is it culture or politics? welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, and around the globe. if you are feeling a little cramped today, you have good reason. planet earth never has a population of 7 billion. the philippines was the first country to declare the seven billionth person, a little girl who is no doubt aware of all of the fuss. other countries claim milestone babies. the question remains -- can the world cope with so many of us? >> it is more about symbols than exact sums when it comes to global population. the u.n. has declared that in each country, one baby going on october 31 becomes the seven billionth person. there are many tiny candidates. is philippines' contribution dankeeka mae, blissfully unaware of her celebrity status. going in a crowded public hospital in manila, she was greeted with a chocolate
. >> i was one of those kids who always thought that we should know how the world works around us. can we live on earth and we don't fall through the floor and somebody should have given us an owner's manual about how the whole thing fits together and how you use it. >> woodruff: margaret warner examines the rapid rise in c.e.o. pay at the nation's biggest companies, coming amid growing protests on wall street. >> ifill: and kira kay reports on the challenges facing liberia, as the struggling democracy prepares for next week's presidential election. >> seeing what they can gain from peace to not want to go back to war. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investin
this morning. >> as an eager senate intern, the first thing that they needed us to do was open the mail. >> narrator: the envelope was on the top of the stack. >> i remember looking at it, and it looked like children's handwriting, and the return address was the fourth grade class. so i took the scissors and cut into the corner of the letter, just about an inch, and white powder immediately fell out all over me. >> she sees spores, and immediately puts her finger bravely on the ripped bit of the envelope to protect everybody from more spores coming out. >> it looked like baby powder. i was wearing a dark gray skirt and black shoes, and you could see it just vividly on the dark colors. >> narrator: the powder was anthrax, a deadly bacteria. >> it was a crime in progress because it is live anthrax spores. the fear was that it was absolutely spreading through the entire senate office building. >> narrator: this particular anthrax was highly floatable and potentially quite deadly. >> it travels hundreds and hundreds of feet. it takes months to decontaminate these offices. the spores are eve
of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the struggle to put americans back to work dominated the day in congress from president obama's jobs bill, to free trade, to china's currency. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman has the story. >> reporter: the legislative future of the president's jobs plan was as murky today as the rain clouds over the capitol. last night, senate republicans blocked the democrats' version of the $450 billion bill saying it would not work, and might make things worse. the president vowed today to keep pushing, as he addressed a latino heritage event in washington. >> we wil
marketplace. >> washington is the government and therefore they can screw us up, and that's the simple starting point and historically the tech industry has largely ignored washington. >> woodruff: and we close with a profile of poet philip shultz and his new memoir on overcoming the challenges of dyslexia. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible
the euro-zone will use its $610 billion bailout fund. and how to ensure the stability of european banks. the top priority is planning for a structured debt default by greece. >> i think the best we can hope for at this point is that europeans reassure markets that greece will be allowed to default in an orderly way and the greek default will not affect italy, because the european leaders will, as a second important step, take steps to backstop and support the italian government bond market. >> tom: stocks moved higher as european leaders worked towards a debt resolution. the dow rose 162 points, the nasdaq added 12 and the s&p 500 up nearly 13 points. big board volume continues above one billion shares while nasdaq volume climbed above two billion. sales of new homes were up last month following four straight monthly declines. the commerce department says sales jumped nearly 6% as builders lowered prices in a soft market. separately, another report shows companies ordered more heavy machinery and computers in september. overall demand slipped by just under 1%, but that was largely becau
of safety. and u.s. teams in europe for the final showdown of the world series. but the venezuelan academy training baseball stars can barely stay in the game. welcome to viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. talks are under way that could see gaddafi's son surrendering for trial. it is not clear where negotiations are taking place because it is not clear where the leaders the sun is actually is. he called for clouds -- crowds to murder rebels during early stages of the revolution. >> this was the last public fighting shortly after the fall of tripoli in late august. he had been reported captured and suddenly turned up to be supporters that spoke to journalists. he disappeared just as quickly and went on the run. the chief prosecutor of the international criminal courts says they have been informal conversations regarding his possible surrender. there are unconfirmed reports that mercenary's might be trying to find refuge. they will obviously want to stop that from happening. rumors have been circulating that he is in southern libya. an arrest here with me that trial in libya. if
suffering from the cold. >> thank you very much for joining us. some amazing stories of survival there. we will keep you updated on any further development. staying in the region, the united states has pulled its ambassador out of syria because of concern for his safety. the state department is blaming the syrian authorities for a campaign of incitement against robert ford. last month, he was pelted with tomatoes and eggs by pro- government supporters. syria has now withdrawn its ambassador to washington. for more on the growing diplomatic tensions, i am joined by a former u.s. ambassador to syria. thank you so much for joining me. the state department is saying that it has been braque -- brought back for consultations. how serious is this? >> it is not as serious as a formal recall court certainly even a break in relations. either of those events had happened. it is not unprecedented to be recalling ambassadors for consultation. in this case, it was more serious because they said there was incitement and threats against the ambassador. he already has experienced several incidents in which
only gotten worse. the deaths of ever more gruesome -- deaths ever more gruesome. veracruz used to boast that it was mexico's say this city, but the empty beaches tell a different story. 35 bodies were left on the street in daylight, people who had been downed, tortured, and killed. empty homes have been boarded up after they were used to hide corpses. this is one of three locations where more than 30 bodies were found dumped in house is just a few days ago. it is part of an increasingly vicious battle that has been taking place in mexico. as you can see, the marines have been deployed on to the streets of a city that, until recently, was perfectly safe. many of those killed are victims in a tit-for-tat between drug gangs, but not all. dirty tricks and political cowardice means some innocent men are wrongly accused. speaking out is a rare and dangerous thing to do in mexico, but we met janet figueroa, who is prepared to take the risk just to clear her father's name. he was mechanic caught in the crossfire of a gun battle. janet says the state fabricated evidence that he was a cr
than 100 u.s. cities had protests on saturday. occupy wall street began as opposition to the perceived greed of large u.s. financial firms and growing wealth disparitys made worse by the recession but over the weekend it gained momentum abroad especially in europe where it dove tailed with long-running demonstrations against wage and benefit cuts recently adopted by cash-strapped european governments. in rome, throngs filled the streets near the ancient roman chros but the peaceful gathering into a riot when some in the crowd smashed windows and burned cars. police used tear gas and fire hoses to push back crowds, and officials estimated property damage at more than a million dollars. there were clashes in germany as well. as protestors marched on the parliament building in berlin. and in london where protesters were pushed away from the london stock exchange before making their way to st. paul's cathedral. wikileaks founder julian assange addressed the crowd there. >> this movement is not about the obstruction of law. it is about the construction of law. >> reporter: but today russian
on the rising tide of economic discontent and the tools government still has to try, i'm churned by a former u.s. labor secretary professor, robert reischauer. the protests we see around america are not on scale of volume seen in madrid, athens or paris. why do you think they are not? >> americans are very frustrated, to be sure. the degree to economic -- the degree of economic stress right now has not been as high during the great depression, but it is not as high as it was during the great depression. many young people are out of work and is not terribly surprising some of them have taken to the streets. there doesn't seem to be a very clear and precise agenda for this movement, if you want to call it a movement, except that there is great trust and -- great distrust and anger directed at wall street and big corporations. we may see more, but it is hard to tell. >> ben bernanke seem to be blaming what's happening in europe and the white house has woken up to the fact that if europe collapses in some form or another, there is very little they can do here. >> very little. the united states econo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)